In Pictures: How Jallianwala Bagh Martyrs Memorial Looks After Repairs?

 A picture of PM Modi paying tribute at Jallianwala Bagh

1650 bullets and 379 corpses. Both these figures are of Jallianwala Bagh. 1650 bullets were fired by the British officer General Dyer and 379 Indians were killed.


This was an incident that exposed the cruel and oppressive side of British rule to the world 102 years ago.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi will dedicate to the nation the reconstructed memorial of Jallianwala Bagh memorial built in memory of this incident on the coming Saturday.


 Dyer and his soldiers had entered Jallianwala Bagh through this route

It has been told by the Press Information Bureau that in the process of reconstruction, work has been done on long-standing and under-utilized buildings so that they can be used once.


 Working in this direction, four museum galleries have been constructed in the complex which depict the historical significance of various events taking place in the erstwhile Punjab.


3D and projection technology will show why

Along with this, efforts will be made to present these events with the help of 3D, projection mapping, art, sculpture etc.

PIB has told that presentations will be given through audio-visual medium to make the world aware of the history of this period.

Along with this, efforts will be made to present these events with the help of 3D, projection mapping, art, sculpture etc.


 3D and projection technology will show why

PIB has told that presentations will be given through audio-visual medium to make the world aware of the history of this period.

Along with this, efforts will be made to present these events with the help of 3D, projection mapping, art, sculpture etc.

 

Image Source, PIB INDIA

It tells the historical importance of the events of that period and their importance.

Historian Harjeshwar Pal Singh had told in an article published on the BBC how and under what circumstances General Dyer was sent to Amritsar.

She Wrote

On 13th April, it was around 4.30 pm, General Dyer ordered to open fire on about 25 to 30 thousand people present in Jallianwala Bagh.


 Firing point of Jallianwala Bagh from where Dyer's soldiers opened fire on unarmed people

That too without any prior warning. This firing continued for about ten minutes without stopping for a second. After the orders of General Dyer, the soldiers fired about 1650 rounds of bullets.

The shooters were tired of firing bullets and 379 living people had become zombies. (Unofficially it is said that about a thousand people died.


 इमGalleries built in Jallianwala Bagh

General Dyer was born in India

Very few people know that General Dyer, the British officer who opened fire on unarmed people, was born in India itself.

Singh says in his article, "Dyer was born in India and his father worked as a brewer. Dyer knew both Urdu and Hindustani very well.

His people knew Dyer very well but he did not have a very good reputation among his superiors.

Dyer is named in history as the butcher of Amritsar and is considered not only by nationalists but also by imperialists. His ruthless act is seen as an exception to the British presence in India."

Machine gun use

There was a worldwide reaction to this incident that happened in Jallianwala Bagh. It was a reaction that exposed the brutal and oppressive face of the British Raj.

Singh writes, "The official Hunter Commission inquiry and the unofficial Congress investigation found that General Dyer was the only person of his kind to have such thinking and carried out this thinking.

 

Bullet Mark on Walls


In front of the Hunter Commission, Dyer admitted that he had used machine guns on the people and that there was a narrow road leading to the garden and the soldiers were ordered to fire wherever they saw the largest number of people.

When the firing stopped, there was neither a medical system for the injured nor the last rites of the dead bodies. He was widely revered as the "saviour of the British Empire".


 This brutal mass murder by a British officer personally was the first incident in itself. Violence, brutality and political oppression was not the first time nor was it an exception in the British Raj, but it was a different level of cruelty in itself."