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Monday, November 2, 2020

US Election: Why are women necessary for Trump's victory?

 

The votes of women who live in towns or suburban areas are also very important in the US elections. Some such women are telling here which issues are important for them and for what reasons they are supporting which candidate.


Kimberley Cribbel showed me a loving house, telling her that she wants such a house for herself. The house is near her mother-in-law's house in East Noriton, Philadelphia. Kimberley lives with her husband in an apartment about a mile away from here. She wants a house where her pet dog also has enough space to roam.

She says, "Whenever I go through here, I get jealous looking at the yard."

Cribbell, 46, says she is a fan of Trump's business-backed policies and hopes that she and her husband will have a better chance of buying the house they want if Trump remains president. She says, "He has really handled the economy in a great way."

She also praises Trump for many other reasons. She grew up in a Christian family. She supports Trump's policies regarding abortion. Cribel also praises Trump for the way he talks about religious freedom.

She is not alone in having such a positive attitude towards Trump. Many of his neighbors also support his view.

54-year-old Meryl Dalley-Parker is a nurse. When I ask them about Trump, she starts laughing. She says that she is concerned about systemic racism, viruses and high unemployment rate.

She says, "There are so many things with which we are struggling as a nation." They believe that Trump has taken many things to the abyss.

These two towns women have two different views about President Trump.

Vote for women is important?

Women's votes have always been important in American elections. According to the think tank Piu, the percentage of women voting is higher than men. The attitude of women voters has also been given more consideration during the election campaign as Trump wants to bridge the gap of support for women he meets.

They are far behind in getting the support of women from their rival Joe Biden. According to a recent survey by news channel ABC, where 61 percent of women in Pennsylvania have spoken about supporting Biden, Trump has only 38 percent of women.

Pennsylvania is one of the states where votes have a decisive role in elections. Therefore, the support of women living here is of special importance to the leaders. Trump is trying to get the support of the women here.

He has spoken of ending crime. He told them to be cautious while mentioning the promises of the Democratic Party.

At the same time, the Democratic Party has promised to provide houses at an affordable price. During a rally in Michigan, Trump asked if he would "like to bring an affordable housing project to the neighborhood of his beautiful town home?"

In other rallies also he raised similar questions.

At a rally in Nevada, Trump said, "I will save your home. I will save your community. I will reduce crime."

At a rally in Pennsylvania, she pleaded with the women, "Would you like me?"

Women issues also matter in Joe Biden's agenda

Biden also engaged in female voters during the election campaign. There are many such things in his agenda which have been done keeping in mind the women of the town area. This includes issues such as healthcare, climate change and universal pre-school.

The way the two leading presidential candidates are working to get the support of the women of these towns, this has given these women a chance to test their town life and both these candidates.

Trump supporter Kimberley Cribbell and Biden supporter Merrill Dalley-Parker offer two views of American town life. American towns are generally considered to be whites and antiquarian. The area where Daley-Parker lives is progressive. However, in some cases the people there are divided.

In a side street, there is a trump signboard on one side and Biden on the other side. "First the signboard of Biden came and then the trump," says Cribbell.

However, there are still more Democrats in this county. There are 300,000 registered Democrats and around 210,000 registered Republicans. Daley-Parker and her husband Tony Parker say that there has been political change in the past two decades.

Says Tony Parker, "You can roam here and see many such Biden-backed boards. But when I first came to live here, there weren't so many Democrats here."

However, Cribbell also represents a strong political trend. According to him, white women living in towns support the trump. In the last election, it was assumed that women would support a woman candidate, Hillary Clinton, but Trump proved to be a stronger candidate because many women, like Cribbell, felt that Trump was a stronger candidate.

51-year-old Dasha Pruitt, a resident of the adjacent town of Drexel Hill, is a supporter. She has worked as an executive assistant in an insurance company. She says that she feels the things said about Trump's tax reduction policy, immigration policy and law and order.

She says, "Trump wants security in our country." However, Daisha herself came to America from Moscow when she was 10 years old.

Daisha hopes Trump will become president once again. She says, "The stock market is still doing well and that is because of Trump's policies. He has paid attention to American workers."

She adds, "I like the fact that they follow the policy of keeping America at the forefront. They also care about blue collar jobs, I also like it"

In 2016, she and many other women living in suburban areas praised the trump. Nearly 52 percent of white women voted for Trump. However, later their support among the white women continued to decrease. According to a national survey, about 54 percent of white women are supporting Biden this time, while 45 percent of women are supporting Trump.

29-year-old Beth Jacksonier is a librarian. She lives in the Bridgeport suburb of Montgomery County. She is pro-Biden and says she is shocked by Trump's decision to back out of the Paris Agreement on Climate Change.

She says, "I am looking at such candidates who do not ruin my country."

Talking about Trump, she says that she is engaged in reversing the Paris Agreement and other work done by Democrats. Along with Biden's supporting board, Jacquire has another board in his hand, written on Black Lives Matter.

She and other women living in towns or suburbs say that when Trump talks about these areas, he shows the image of houses built during the fifties when white houses were surrounded by fences.

Personal image

52-year-old lawyer Sandra Thompson says she gives her message to white women who "think they want to separate their homes from black people. Sandra lives in York, a suburb of Pennsylvania."

Trump has warned that if Biden comes, these suburbs will be ruined. While saying this, he believes that now African-American families also live with whites in these suburbs, and these suburbs have more diversity than racially and religiously earlier. Thompson and other women living in the suburbs do not accept Trump's housing policy and warnings about possible violence.

"Such scare tactics are inappropriate," says Dalley-Parker.

39-year-old Daniel Kwok Phillips lives in Norberth. She is a student of law. She says, "As a woman living in the suburbs, I want diversity here. I would be happy if affordable housing scheme is implemented here."

This view was supported by most of the thirty women whom I spoke to during this report.

Lawrence Levy, executive dean of the National Center for Suburban Studies at Hofstra University in Hampstead, New York, says the president's language is "distinctly racial." According to him, "We have seen dissatisfaction among women living in the suburbs."

For Daley-Parker, the issue of crime is not as important. They are more concerned about epidemics, healthcare and racism. She says, "My children are African-Americans and I don't want them to live in such a world."

His views on Trump have become more talked about in recent months. Earlier this year, she was infected with the Corona virus. Her husband and one of her daughters were also infected. Now they are all fine, but they know what it is like to live during an epidemic. She says that the president's statement that people should not be afraid of this is wrong and their conduct regarding it is not right.

Daley-Parker says, "Whether it's Kovid or Debate. It was so bad. He lacks leadership. He feels disrespectful about what he thinks he can do." "

Daniel Quoque Phillips says that she was stunned by the President's attitude to change the issues during the debate.

She says that President Trump avoids the questions of 'domination of whites' which mean to me. It matters to me how the president views the issue of apartheid.

In contrast, Biden's respect for one another and respect for dignity matters to him and women like him in other towns.

Daley-Parker says, "I like the way Biden talks to people. He speaks directly to them and he remembers people. He really understands people."

All the women I met in these suburban areas were not politically active before Trump became President.

Trump has made it personal for people to assess issues. Some people see him as a hero and some people see him as a bad force.

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